Dyslexia is less common with readers of Asian languages than Western languages.Are we really all create equal?

Dyslexia is less common with readers of Asian languages than Western languages.Are we really all create equal?

Chinese languages and writing have attracted the attention of outsiders for many centuries. To this day, we’re still learning new things. One of the biggest differences between East and West is that many Asian languages use characters to represent words or ideas instead of letters.

Typical Chinese readers have heavy activity in the brain's left middle frontal gyrus (which relates to the memory of visual images). English readers show high activity in other regions of the brain. In each language, dyslexics have less activity in those respective places.

According to one estimate, 15% of English speakers are dyslexic. In Chinese, it’s about 7%. Actually, it may be more complicated than that, because there is debate about what is meant by “dyslexic.”

A reader/writer of English who commonly reverses letters is said to be dyslexic. Since there are Asian languages that use characters instead of letters, is it fair to even use the word?

What that all means is that it may be possible to be dyslexic in one language but not in another! Why? Because reading different languages requires different sets of skills, oftentimes. In English, it’s necessary to convert letters into sounds, but that does not hold true for some Asian languages.

(Source)

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