Most of the Dwarf names in Tolkien’s ‘The Hobbit’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’ were sourced from the ‘Dvergata’ (The Catalog of Dwarfs) – a section of an Old Norse poem

Most of the Dwarf names in Tolkien’s ‘The Hobbit’ and ‘Lord of the Rings’ were sourced from the ‘Dvergata’ (The Catalog of Dwarfs) – a section of an Old Norse poem

It is a known fact that J.R.R. Tolkien structured 'The Hobbit' and 'The Lord of the Rings' trilogy around the languages he developed himself.

They're accepted as 'real' languages as they each have their own unique structure and grammar.

Tolkien said this of his writing style: The invention of languages is the foundation. The 'stories' were made rather to provide a world for the languages than the reverse. To me a name comes first and the story follows."

Clearly names are very important to him and that is probably why a section of Vlusp (the first poem of a collection of Old Norse poems) appealed to him. The section is called the Dvergata and translated it means 'the Catalog of Dwarfs'.

Tolkien took almost all of the names of the Dwarfs of Middle Earth as well as Gandalf's name from the Dvergata. Tolkien's youngest son, Christopher, suggests that "those Dwarf-names in The Hobbit provided the whole starting-point for the Mannish languages in Middle-earth."

At least twenty five of Tolkien's Dwarfs were named after Dwarfs listed in this section of the poem contained in stanzas ten to sixteen of Vlusp.

When people asked Tolkien what 'The Lord of the Rings' is all about, he used to reply: "It is to me, anyway, largely an essay in 'linguistic aesthetic."

(Source)

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