During World War I, German and Russian soldiers ceased fire to cooperate on a wolf hunt!

During World War I, German and Russian soldiers ceased fire to cooperate on a wolf hunt!

During World War I, the Eastern Front stretched from the Black Sea in the south to the Baltic Sea in the North. During the extreme winter of 1916 and 1917, at the time of World War I, wolves in the area were starving due to a food shortage.

The starving wolves started converging on both the Russian and German soldiers in the northern part of the front in the Vilnius-Minsk region. Driven by extreme hunger, their desperation became more overwhelming than their fear for humans.

At first, the wolves were attacking individuals, but soon they escalated their attacks to groups of soldiers. The attacks became so viscious and regular that the soldiers were forced to take action.

The soldiers tried to poison them, they tried shooting them with rifles and machine guns, and even using grenades against them. None of their efforts stopped the attacks. The large Russian wolves were so hungry that new wolf packs quickly replaced those that were killed.

The German and Russian soldiers were left with no other option but to declare a cease-fire to deal with the wolves. In a coordinated effort, hundreds of wolves were killed and the rest scattered. Once the wolves were dealt with, fighting resumed between the two countries and all thoughts of cooperation were erased.

(Source)

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